‘Smaller class sizes lead to better educational outcomes’

In a video article in the Telegraph, 02/04/13, education expert John Bangs suggests that class sizes in the state system should be slashed to levels seen in fee-paying schools.

Class sizes in the state system should be slashed to levels seen in fee-paying schools as part of a radical overhaul of the working day, teachers’ leaders said today.

The National Union of Teachers said activitists should consider strike action to enforce rigid new rules covering maximum lesson sizes and a 35-hour working week.

Under new plans, the union is demanding a 23-pupil limit on classes for pupils aged five-to-seven – around 25 per cent down on the current maximum.

Activists will also lobby the Government for a maximum class size of 18 for GCSE lessons to make sure teenagers get more feedback from teachers.

The NUT said that new caps should be imposed to bring schools into line with institutions such as Eton where “the richest in society” can pay for smaller lessons.

John Bangs, from Cambridge University's Faculty of Education, suggests that "smaller classes are part of guaranteeing better educational outcomes.

"Highly qualified teachers up against it with classes of 30-35...are less likely to be able to devote time to individual pupils when they need one-on-one attention," he says.

Click here to read the article © The Telegraph.