“Character” – something else to add to the educational shopping-list?

I am greatly encouraged that Mrs Nicky Morgan, the new kid on the Education block, has conceded that education is about far more than merely the acquisition of qualifications. Indeed, she goes further in putting government money where her mouth is: "The £3.5m grant scheme for character education projects is a milestone in preparing young people more than ever before for life in modern Britain”.

As the leader of a school which values a holistic approach to education, I certainly would applaud this intention to give value to the overall personal development of an individual. What I question is why are we caught in a self-perpetuating matrix of segmenting learning in this way?  Is "character" to be something else to be put onto the educational shopping-list of what schools must deliver to be solemnly measured by some arcane Ofsted indicator? I find it somewhat questionable that character development can be promoted through a series of character building "projects". Mrs Morgan may argue that she is advocating a balanced education but for me this box ticking approach misses the point of what a good education should offer a youngster.

The learning environment valued by a school should be supporting the positive personal development of every learner. Far from box ticking, learners should be encouraged to think outside the comfort of their box - taking risks, learning from mistakes, taking the time to understand the perspectives of others. This can happen within the classroom through a curriculum where young people are encouraged to take intellectual risks and challenge others and not constantly feel that they are a set of data to be weighed. And of course in co-curricular activities where there are a myriad of opportunities for individuals to learn about themselves.

And how does this debate about character sit with the digital revolution which is changing our world in intended and unintended ways? The World Innovation Summit for Education, a Qatar sponsored education charity, recently carried out a survey of educational experts across the globe asking their opinion about what schools will be like in 2030. The results are fascinating - if the predictions are right, a student’s interpersonal skills will be their most valued asset, with 75% of respondents ranking it number one compared to 42% for academic knowledge. In this world where online content will be king, old fashioned knowledge becomes secondary.  Collaboration, creativity and communication will be vital skills, underpinned by critical thinking.

It strikes me that an approach to learning which values intellectual as well as personal development - not treating them as a false binary - will offer the best possible educational experience for youngsters in this future of unknowns. After all, studying the works of Shakespeare will give you a deep insight into resilience and grit in an abstract sense whilst an outward bound activity, for example the Duke of Edinburgh Award, places the learner in a personally challenging situation. Actually Mrs Morgan, I think we already have the tools for this task - let educational professionals get on and use them.

By Tricia Kelleher, Principal, Stephen Perse Foundation